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sweetrobna commented on
Posted by
1 point · 3 hours ago

In CA even illegal recordings can be used in criminal proceedings

But a recording you made to prove your innocence may not be good evidence, the jury could believe you tampered with it

sweetrobna commented on
Posted by
2 points · 3 hours ago

Contact the embassy of the country you are a citizen of and get a replacement passport. You probably can’t go to Thailand or other counties besides the one you are a citizen of with a pending drug charge

Also contact a criminal defense attorney in VA

sweetrobna commented on
Posted by
1 point · 5 hours ago

Hire your own exterminator and follow their advice.

The most important part is to remove sources of water/moisture, remove access to food. Physically block access, plugging any gaps or holes.

Then there are different options to kill them. Some pet safe options like diamataceous earth, sticky traps, citrus based deterrents can work well. Borax/sugar, boric acid, and more traditional insectides like temprid are very effective and can spread to kill a whole "nest". Foggers/bombs can work quickly too.

sweetrobna commented on
Posted by
1 point · 5 hours ago

About 4 years and 9 months ago the HOA should have filed a lien and started foreclosure proceedings. With it going on this long without legal action there may be some bad debt the HOA is not able to legally collect because it is past the statute of limitations. In CA it is 5 years. This is all pretty common stuff for an attorney

sweetrobna commented on
Posted by
1 point · 5 hours ago

You have it backwards. The property is part of the HOA. If you own the property, you are a homeowner in the HOA. If you don't want to join, don't buy the property.

sweetrobna commented on
Posted by
1 point · 5 hours ago

The way an HOA is formed is when all the land is owned by one company or person, they subdivide it into common areas and individual lots and attach deed restrictions tying it all together. So all of the homeowners are part owners of the common area and responsible for it, and the homeowners enforces the rules between each other. The HOA is "needed" because the city or county government doesn't want to be responsible for maintaining the storm drains, retention ponds, sidewalks, street lights, or sometime streets. They don't want to pay to maintain it because the tax revenue from the new development is already spent covering maintenance from older neighborhoods. And because the clean water act makes the state responsible for stormwater related pollution of the local government doesn't handle it. Raising taxes on everyone is unpopular politically when they can just shift the burden to newer homeowners.

So you can easily prevent an HOA from forming if you get a developer to build out the community and get the government to be responsible for maintaining the infrastructure going forward. The local government can use a mello roos or a special tax district, or just charge a sustainable amount of taxes to cover future maintenance. This isn't all that rare really, most developers don't care about the HOA as long as the local government will approve their building permits, lot subdivision, zoning changes.

On the legal side, a deed restriction can be changed if nearly all of the homeowners agree. So if you sell it as one big lot to a developer they can just remove the deed restriction entirely and create an HOA. If you divide up the land and only sell some of it it is still possible the developer buys out the other land, or pays them to vote to change the rule. So it needs to be in everyone's best interest for the status quo to be maintained. Another issue is the developer could just violate the restriction, unless one of the other owners takes them to court nothing happens. The city or county won't enforce deed restrictions generally. Or the developer could get the restriction removed through the courts if it goes against public policy. Consider what would happen if you divide the land into 24 plots for individual homes, 4 of the homes could have access to a public road, the other 20 need to share roads/driveways. But the deed restrictions say they can't be charged dues for road maintenance. In many cases the courts would remove the restriction so the road costs could be shared fairly.

If you succeed and prevent any future owner from creating an HOA but the the county won't allow for much home development without an HOA then the land is nearly worthless. So this accomplishes your goal, but then you no longer own a piece of desirable real estate unless you can address that.

sweetrobna commented on
Posted by
2 points · 7 hours ago

In NYC, northern NJ, Boston, the norm is for the renter to pay 1 months rent as a brokers fee, sometimes 15% of a years rent. The listing broker splits the fee with your renter's broker, usually 50/50. The renter's broker gives part of that back to your agent. This split might be 60/40 for a lower volume agent, with the broker keeping 40%.

If the listing is "no fee" there is no listing broker commission you are responsible for, any commission to your agent is between you two. Many large apartment buildings are no fee, the landlord has onsite staff. If the listing is "owner pays" the landlord pays the listing broker and pays out to your broker/agent.

Commissions in rentals are negotiable. Your agent can waive the commission or rebate it, so you pay half instead for a normal listing. Or you get some money back from an owner pays listing.

Or you could go without an agent, and look for no fee or owner pays listings and apply directly with the listing agent.

Also if your agent didn't explain this all to you they aren't doing a good job. If you are going to use an agent you should talk to a few and pick one you are comfortable with instead.

If you are in southern NJ, or basically anywhere else in the country then usually real estate agents aren't involved with rentals. You are expected to contact the landlord or their property manager directly. There are no brokers fees.

sweetrobna commented on
Posted by
2 points · 7 hours ago

Cleveland OH has the best ratio of median income to home prices at $26k and $69k. It is all USDA eligible, so you can get a loan with zero down.

But you get what you pay for. You get twice the national average snowfall. Schools and other government services overall are poor in areas with cheap homes. The economy is not great, not that bad either though, unemployment is about 6.8%. Crime overall is 3-4x the average, but that is in the range of normal for larger cities.

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