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r/musictheory
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A subreddit for people who care about composition, cognition, harmony, scales, counterpoint, melody, logic, math, structure, notation, and also the overall history and appreciation of music.
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r/romanticism
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A community dedicated to Romantic and Proto-Romantic movements, in all their shapes and forms!
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r/baroquecomposition
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This subreddit is for compositions which are in imitation of music from the Baroque era (1600-1750). This may include concerti, fugues, suite movements, and the like. Users may post works that they have written--so long as we can hear and give feedback or show our appreciation. Period instrument recordings would be spectacular, however computer-generated recordings (like MIDI) is still acceptable. Scores would be optional but encouraged.
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Main Gothic Metal subreddit.
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Posted by1 month ago
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Posted by1 month ago
  • r/TeensMeetTeens - [19m] just got broken up with but I’m not too broken up. Just message me, idc who, but it’s a plus if you like romantic era music
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Posted by7 months ago

I recently came across this YouTube channel: collectionCB. It's a channel that dedicates itself to digitizing and making public an insane amount of underrated/lesser known/forgotten Romantic/Modern era composers and their compositions. Perhaps a lot of you already know it, but I'll mention it here anyways.

A lot of people come to this subreddit with questions like: "What are some lesser known Rachmaninov-like composers?" or "Can you recommend any non-mainstream concertos/symphonies/operas of this or that style?" (myself included), and this series of channels I have come across is like an Alexandrian Library of forgotten 19th, 20th and 21st century compositions.

The curator has created 5 channels now: collectionCB, collectionCB2, ... collectionCB5, and it's filled with rare recordings of composers like Bortkiewicz, Bacri, Pierné, Coulthard, Stoyanov, Skulte, Ostijn, Knipper, Trudic... I mean: a whole paradise of music to explore and enjoy. Each channel consists of some 500+ videos, containing piano, violin, cello, flute, trumpet... concertos, symphonies, ballades, sonatas, miscellaneous solo works for all kinds of instruments... just an endless stream of greatness!

I'm just really excited I get to share this, and maybe I will have guided some of you to a new vault of stupendous musical genius!

Here are some links:

https://www.youtube.com/user/collectionCB

https://www.youtube.com/user/collectionCB2

https://www.youtube.com/user/collectionCB3

https://www.youtube.com/user/collectionCB4

https://www.youtube.com/c/collectionCB5

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Posted by1 year ago

I am a big fan of Fredric Chopin, particularly his style of composition. And while there are a lot of notable figures from this time period, I noticed there is a small school of pianists from this period that utilize very similar composition techniques. The style seemed to emerge sometime in the late 1770s, and gradually faded into obscurity soon after the later romantic era. A lot of the similarity 1840's onward could be attributed to Chopin's influence, for that reason I am more interested in the music that preceded Chopin.

John Field - Creator of the Nocturne
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MPFv7FyuSlI
Charles Mayer - Studied with Field (With the music below falsely attributed to Chopin)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kp33Hclpf6g
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=txvezHBHDSw
Friedrich Kalkbrenner (Chopin really admired him and this piano concerto served as inspiration for his own)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CclQ1tGmGws&t=558s
Ignacy Feliks Dobrzyński - A Classmate of Chopin
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h8o8L-lSdCY
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=26swXy5CkJo (Note that the theme at 8:26 seem to be where Chopin got the theme for his Scherzo https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z_MwPdr7WXQ at 0:36)

All of the above seem to have a very similar style and seem to follow similar compositional rules. The classmate in particular interests me because the fact his music resembles Chopin's suggests that his teachers had a big impact in his style of music. Is there a book of some sorts that may dive into these compositional techniques in particular? I am having trouble finding good material to study from since all books I find are dated and mystify composition, or are technical but mainly center around jazz and modern music theory. And again I am not really interested in Romantic era music in general, since a lot of the music from that time period doesnt exactly fall within this style, just the techniques used in this style in particular.

Some other Musicians that follow this style include (Did not mention these above since they were likely influenced by Chopin)

Scriabin
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wuDcziYoQZI
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uz3TqZtAkeQ
Moszkowski
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mcsRPSCYn1M
Carl Filtsch (A pupil of Chopin)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Eul0DI5DnhI
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C7MmOAsjiXc
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hAfhzvuKHE8

One of the things that fascinates me about Filtsch is that he is one of the few pupils to gain the privilege of learning Composition from Chopin and I think it shows. And the fact that Chopin could pass down his style to his pupils sort of suggests there is more to it than just "Cantabile Operatic Melodies" and "Chromatic harmonies" like people seem to imply.

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Posted by2 years ago
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Posted by4 years ago
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Posted by5 years ago

TL;DR There's a ton of Romatic Era music, so far it I can't get into it as much as Classical Era (and early Romantic) music. Any tips or key pieces that might help?

A quick summary on my musical tastes: for the last 20 years or so (basically my adult life), I've been mostly a rock guy. Classic rock, blues, blues-rock, some metal, shredder guitar instrumental rock, and also some electronic music. Off and on I've dipped a toe or two into classical music (in the general sense, not necessarily Classic Era specifically), but never really invested more than a few CDs and some light/casual listening.

The first classical CD I purchased was Vivaldi's Four Seasons. That was back in college, when a professor was playing it in the auditorium before the lecture started. I emailed her to find out what it was. I still love it to this day. Over the years I picked up some more random classical CDs; the ones I enjoyed the most were Beethoven's symphonies (the Third remains my favorite, followed by the Sixth).

A couple months ago, I was in my local library and said, "I'm going to get serious about classical music". I checked out the first book I found on the topic: Classical Music 101 by Fred Plotkin. This book was great for me. In fact, I ended up buying it, because I couldn't finish it before needing to return it, and was spending too much money buying every CD suggestion in the book.

What I've found: so far, I'm having trouble getting into stuff that is typically considered "High Romantic" or later. What I like the best is the Classical Era stuff, particularly Mozart's and Haydn's late symphonies. I like a lot of the early Romantic stuff or Classical-Romantic "bridge" music, e.g. Beethoven.

Right now, if I had to pick a single piece I like best, it's the first movement of Mendelssohn's Octet. I love love love love this piece! I "ration" my listening of it, so I don't get tired of it! Same goes for Mozart's Symphony 41 (Jupiter), particularly the last movement. Maybe it's because I have so much "emotional capital" invested in rock music, as these pieces to me have a "rock" feel to them: easy-to-hum (and memorable) melodies (like "hooks" in pop music), a more "predictable" (?) structure, and counterpoint that (to me) is less Bach and more like the live version of "Free Bird".

I see so much love for (for example) Tchaikovsky's Symphonies, Berlioz (Symphonie Fantastique), and Mahler... I don't dislike these guys or their works by any means, and I can certainly appreciate their technical aspects. But I haven't been able to "connect" with them the same as I have the stuff I mentioned above.

So, all that said, any thoughts? My current plan is to continue listening to the stuff I know I like, while periodically re-visiting the stuff with which I haven't yet clicked. I figure eventually I'll click or give up. But I'm open to other suggestions as well.

Thanks!

Edit Wow, so many suggestions, way more than I expected! It will take me a while to work my way through all these suggestions---but that is the point! Thank you all!

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