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Posts about Medieval music

r/MedievalMusic
5.2k members
A subreddit to share and talk about medieval music, or music that has a medieval feel to it.
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r/medieval
14.5k members
This is a sub for medieval enthusiasts of all descriptions. Please be kind to your fellow posters. Trolling, nastiness, racism, etc are grounds for an immediate ban.
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r/MedievalHistory
40.9k members
Welcome to r/MedievalHistory
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r/classicalmusic
1.4m members
Whether you're a musician, a newbie, a composer or a listener, welcome. Please turn off your phone, and applaud between threads, not individual posts.
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r/musictheory
498k members
A subreddit for people who care about composition, cognition, harmony, scales, counterpoint, melody, logic, math, structure, notation, and also the overall history and appreciation of music.
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r/RedditSessions
512k members
This is a Reddit Public Access Network (RPAN) broadcast community where you can livestream musical performances from your studio, the subway, your couch, or wherever it is you like to play.
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r/lewronggeneration
302k members
This is a subreddit dedicated to satirically mocking those people who, blinded by their own nostalgia, believe certain things in the past to be unequivocally better than today. We place a special emphasis on music, because this subreddit was created after annoyance over "born in the wrong generation" attitude often expressed by fans of 60s/70s rock.
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r/Music
30.7m members
The musical community of reddit
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r/listentothis
17.5m members
Listentothis is the place to discover new and overlooked music. All submissions link directly to music streams. Automated moderation removes spam, reposts, household name bands, and poor amateur music. Other content includes AMAs from on-topic artists, an album discussion club, and genre appreciation threads. Content is tagged by genre and split into editions for easy browsing. Music charts are posted monthly. Sidebar features multireddits that include all 600+ of the other music subreddits.
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r/tipofmytongue
2.0m members
Can't remember the name of that movie you saw when you were a kid? Or the name of that video game you had for Game Gear? Your Google-fu let you down? This is the place to get help. Read the rules and suggestions of this subreddit for tips on how to get the most out of TOMT. (Located right side on desktop, varies on mobile.)
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r/MedievalMusicCovers
1.1k members
A place for all the best in cover songs that just happen to be done in a medieval style. Also Sea Shanties (per community vote on the matter)
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r/MedievalEraMusic
257 members
A subreddit dedicated to musical works composed between 5th and 15th century.
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r/RenaissanceArt
12.9k members
Renaissance means "rebirth" and refers to a period in the development of Western art and culture beginning in 1300 and ending in 1600. It was a time of rediscovery, ambition and change, dominated by a number of trends and contradictions. It is usually associated with Italy, in particular Florence, Venice and Rome, but Northern Europe also contributed to the Renaissance, particularly in the development of Naturalism.
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r/mittelalterrock
97 members
Mittelalter is German for medieval, and this subreddit is for modern music with a Mittelalter focus of some sort - old tune, old lyrics, etc.
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r/Tavernwave
264 members
Changing modern music into an older cover of itself.
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Posted by20 days ago
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Posted by24 days ago
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Posted by3 months ago

I've come across the concept of rhythmic modes and am wondering how rhythm works in medieval music. I know that rhythm back then was closely tied to poetic meter, and that it's not super well understood as notation wasn't as specific compared to today.

So far, I'm getting the impression that people thought of rhythm in proportions rather than time signatures, and that the system of the 6 rhythmic modes suggests that medieval music divides beats into 3 rather than 2 by default. But I'm still confused about how time signatures fit into everything with tempus perfectum/imperfectum, how they went about syncopations, and what rhythms were permitted/forbidden in the style.

Ultimately, I hope that learning about this subject will help inspire me in being more rhythmically creative in my compositions. Thanks for the help!

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Posted by3 months ago
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Crossposted by1 month ago
Posted by1 month ago
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Posted by3 months ago
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