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Anglo-Saxon England
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r/anglosaxon
10.1k members
The early medieval period, known colloquially as the 'Anglo-Saxon' Age, is the period of English history between c.410 and c.1066. This reddit is for questions and materials on 'Anglo-Saxon' history, art, religion, literature, archeology etc. Don't be a racist muppet.
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r/MedievalHistory
41.1k members
Welcome to r/MedievalHistory
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r/history
17.1m members
/r/History is a place for discussions about history. Feel free to submit interesting articles, tell us about this cool book you just read, or start a discussion about who everyone's favorite figure of minor French nobility is! ------------------------------------------------------------ This is a somewhat more serious subreddit compared to many others. Make sure to familiarize yourself with our rules and guidelines before participating. Thanks!
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r/assassinscreed
476k members
For news, discussion and more about Ubisoft's Assassin's Creed franchise.
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r/CrusaderKings
373k members
Crusader Kings is a historical grand strategy / RPG video game series for PC, Mac, Linux, PlayStation 5 & Xbox Series X|S developed & published by Paradox Interactive. Engage in courtly intrigue, dynastic struggles, and holy warfare in mediæval Europe, North Africa, the Middle East, India, the steppes and Tibet. Can you achieve fame and fortune for your noble family, or will your names be forgotten to history?
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r/TheLastKingdom
48.4k members
A subreddit for "The Last Kingdom," the BBC/Netflix television show set in medieval England. The show is an adaption of Bernard Cornwell’s best-selling series of historical novels known as "The Saxon Stories." Content from both the books and the TV series are welcome!
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r/Anglo_Saxons
133 members
The Anglo-Saxons were a cultural group who inhabited England from the 5th century. They comprised people from Germanic tribes who migrated to the island from continental Europe, their descendants, and indigenous British groups who adopted many aspects of Anglo-Saxon culture and language. The Anglo-Saxons established the Kingdom of England, their language heavily influenced modern English and still today the native English people are descended from the Anglo-Saxons.
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r/Fyrnsidu
153 members
Welcome to r/Fyrnsidu
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r/Caproney
98 members
Caproney, also called the Islands of the Caproneys, is an island nation in the North Sea off the coast of Great Britain and Frisia. This is a worldbuilding/conlanging project of a alternate Dogger Bank 20 metres higher, forming an archipelago inhabited by the Caprish, relatives of the Anglo-Saxons. Successor of /r/doggerlundt. As seen on /r/worldbuilding and /r/conlang
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r/iamahistory
21 members
If you know a topic very well, such as the Holocaust or the Anglo-Saxon England lore, you can BE a person from that time period and do a AMA!
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r/BritanniaBoardGame
14 members
The subreddit for the strategy board game Britannia, and all other published or unofficial games using systems developed from the Britannia pattern. Including Maharaja, on the Indian subcontinent. Hispania, covering the Iberian peninsula. And Italia, covering Italy.
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Posted by19 days ago

Our first secure historical date for the people who became the West Saxons occurred at some point in the 630s when a missionary called Birinus baptised their king, Cynegils, at his royal palace near Dorchester on Thames. According to traditions which circulated among later generations of West Saxons they already had a century of history prior to this date, but this history as it has come down to us is often vague and contradictory. In this episode I will go over that history.

https://open.spotify.com/episode/7jDEyDhlYa9SWhJ2d0XqOS?si=6a1ccb8201f542a7

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Posted by1 month ago

https://open.spotify.com/episode/3GxEKXJDaO4JXz932pc32b?si=9f0240529dc04ef9

Following the Battle of Ellendun, Mercia entered an uncertain new phase in its history. No longer the supreme power in England, it was forced to regroup and rebuild amid dynastic strife and encroaching threats from without. It would survive for only a further half century after Beornwulf's death, but rather than being solely a time of decline, that last fifty years saw the emergence of something new which was brutally snuffed out before its time.

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Posted by2 months ago

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nRBpSSdRK7o&ab_channel=Anglo-SaxonEnglandPodcast


In this episode we look at the reign of the last king of the Mercian Supremacy: Coenwulf. We look at how he rebuilt a fractured Mercian dominion in the wake of Offa's death, how he struggled to incorporate the Church into his overlordship, and how a 10th C legend about his son's death was used to explain the whole collapse of the Mercian supremacy that had been a fact of Anglo-Saxon politics for almost 200 years at the time of his death.

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Posted by2 months ago

https://open.spotify.com/episode/7AOag2CXoiFjcFiGhwVm0M?si=53006b4c33744a80

The Mercian Supremacy collapsed within just five years of Coenwulf's death, a dramatic reversal of fortune. Why did this happen and what role did the political instability which gripped Mercia at this time play in the course of events? This episode, follow me as we look at how something as successful as Mercia could come crashing down in such a short span of time.

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Crossposted by3 months ago
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