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Posted by2 months ago

A nationwide study in the United States found that population-weighted exposure to green spaces, especially nearby forests, may reduce the risk of COVID-19 infection (after controlling for population allocation, spatial autocorrelation, and many other types of covariates).

15 comments
93% Upvoted
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I remember seeing a study a while back about how patients in a hospital recovered faster if they could see trees from the window (I don’t remember the exact details but that’s the main idea). Could this be related?

25
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ScIENcE! Ain't it amazing!!!

4
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Trees provide terpenes which are anti inflammatory, so there's a physical reason as to why you would want to be near trees.

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Sounds like people are going for walks and social distancing.

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Op · 2 mo. ago

We adjusted for potential covariates which significantly impact SARS-CoV-2 infection rates, including healthcare and testing rate (Wu et al., 2020), pre-existing chronic diseases (i.e., hypertension and diabetes) (Clerkin et al., 2020; Fang et al., 2020; Sattar et al., 2020), socioeconomic and demographic factors (i.e., racial minority and elderly) (Abedi et al., 2020; Clouston et al., 2021; Karaye & Horney, 2020), politics and policy factors (i.e., political affiliation and stay-at-home orders) (Neelon et al., 2021; Fowler et al., 2021), behavioral factors (i.e., mobility pattern and social distancing) (Badr et al., 2020; McGrail et al., 2020), and environmental factors (i.e., air pollution, crowded housing, and airport density) (Chakrabarty et al., 2021; Gaskin et al., 2021; McLaughlin et al., 2020). The definition of all covariates is presented in Table S2.

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Op · 2 mo. ago

Abstract

The coronavirus pandemic is an ongoing global crisis that has profoundly harmed public health. Although studies found exposure to green spaces can provide multiple health benefits, the relationship between exposure to green spaces and the SARS-CoV-2 infection rate is unclear. This is a critical knowledge gap for research and practice. In this study, we examined the relationship between total green space, seven types of green space, and a year of SARS-CoV-2 infection data across 3,108 counties in the contiguous United States, after controlling for spatial autocorrelation and multiple types of covariates. First, we examined the association between total green space and SARS-CoV-2 infection rate. Next, we examined the association between different types of green space and SARS-CoV-2 infection rate. Then, we examined forest–infection rate association across five time periods and five urbanicity levels. Lastly, we examined the association between infection rate and population-weighted exposure to forest at varying buffer distances (100m to 4km). We found that total green space was negative associated with the SARS-CoV-2 infection rate. Furthermore, two forest variables (forest outside park and forest inside park) had the strongest negative association with the infection rate, while open space variables had mixed associations with the infection rate. Forest outside park was more effective than forest inside park. The optimal buffer distances associated with lowest infection rate are within 1,200m for forest outside park and within 600m for forest inside park. Altogether, the findings suggest that green spaces, especially nearby forest, may significantly mitigate risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection.

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That makes sense, it is well known that sunlight destroys the virus utterly.

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Open space data was mixed, it has nothing to do with the sun, is all populations density.

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TL;DR But wouldnt Green spaces,especially forests, just mean,that its a less dense Population?

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Op · 2 mo. ago

Trees provide terpenes which are anti inflammatory, so there's a physical reason as to why you would want to be near trees.

Please kindly check out the Discussion part. Density is a part of the reason but forests also provide other benefits to promote immune functioning and reduce agents of viruses.

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