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Posted by2 months ago

Vaccine protection against COVID-19 short-lived, booster shots important. A new study has found current mRNA vaccines (Pfizer, Moderna) offer the greatest duration of protection, nearly three times as long as that of natural infection and the Johnson & Johnson and Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccines.

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So...genuine question from a guy who just honestly wants to know: Should I be getting a booster shot every 6-8 months or something? Is there any scientific data on any new-occurrence of side effects due to a fourth or fifth dose of an mRNA vaccine -- not trying to start a fight here, genuinely trying to get educated.

Because my last shot (third dose of Pfizer) was last October, and I tested COVID-positive four days ago. I'd like to avoid this happening again.

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I'm part of the Texas CARES research study which is looking at COVID antibody reponse. As part of that study I've gotten results of antibody tests from a blood draw multiple times including earlier this week. The results are broken down into antibodies from COVID infection and antibodies from COVID infection and vaccination (I don't understand how that works. I'm just as simple country aerospace engineer, not a doctor.). My results have always shown <0.8 antibodies from COVID infection, so everything for me has been from vaccination.

Eight months after being initially fully vaccinated (two doses, TeamModerna) my antibody level was 764 (or something close to that.). My test this week, about 8 months after my only booster (TeamPfizer), showed my antibodies are >2500 (off the top of the scale). This is the same result as my blood draws two weeks and again about three month after my booster. I was surprised that my antibody level was still that high. Previously I was also wondering about getting a second booster (I'm not technically old enough but I'm overweight and that seems to be good enough to be a qualifying "underlying medical condition".). But given this result, I won't be seeking a booster for the time being. If/when boosters more targeted to the newer variants are created and released, I do plan to get one of those. I'm hoping it's bundled with the flu shot this fall (ideally in one shot, but not a big deal to get two shot at one time).

Now, obviously, this is all anecdotal evidence and just from one person. But it does mean that there are people for whom a booster does a great job of providing lasting antibody levels/some level of immunity.

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· 2 mo. ago · edited 2 mo. ago

The vaccine reduces symptoms, it doesn’t negate contraction. I’m planning on getting a booster every six months, as they allow us. The only ones allowed to get a second booster currently are people over 50 65 and immunocompromised.

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With how easily Omi spreads you will never be at zero risk of being infected.

In Canada we just opened up 4th dose to all adults. The senior population got their 4th dose in Jan/Feb. We are likely going to be giving them a 5th soon.

Since Omi this has been trending to a point for something similar to how we treat the seasonal flu, only Omi spreads much much easier. Which means we will likely, at some point, move to annual boosters, likely to address some new sub variant, to try and hold back very large waves in winter months from overloading health care.

Canada opened up 4th dose to try and prevent what we are calling the 7th wave from really upticking.

On a note for you, generally recommend to wait 4 months post infection for a booster. At which point you line up with the winter peak, plus the new version targeted at .4 and .5 Omi variants.

There have been no known side effects in the seniors population unique to the 4th dose.

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I got my booster 9 months ago because people under 50 years old aren’t allowed to get a 2nd booster yet. I ended up catching covid last week. I’m sure my symptoms would more milder if I was able to get a 2nd booster after 6-8 months.

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Comment deleted by user · 2 mo. ago
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I got my last booster in Jan and am still recovering from my first case of Covid (tested pos 2 weeks ago). I think 6 months is about what is currently recommended.

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My Booster was in February and I also tested positive for COVID 4 days ago. At some point you should be getting a booster to ensure high B and T cell immune response to prevent serious outcomes, but that protection lasts quite a bit longer (I believe closer to 1 year) before a booster would be beneficial.

The main problem right now is the "mutations" of covid change the spike proteins that our immune system is looking for, so it is easy to get infected when your immunity came from a previous variation. A booster will not prevent the current strain from infecting you, just hopefully prevent serious side effects.

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level 2

Honestly no vaccine is going to prevent infection. It is all about mitigation of the viral effects.

Follow your local public health guidelines.

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Take double boosters that will take care of you.

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What I’m wondering is how infections play into this. I also had my booster in October and got Omicron in May. My logic is to still hold off on my second booster a while due to the recent infection but experts aren’t really clear on that point. I think I’m kind of as good as I can get for the ongoing surge so I trying to line things up for water surge hits fall or winter. Maybe then it will be the updated Omicron type booster.

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I try to follow this professionally. At present BA-5 is very contagious, wife has it. It can evade the 4 vaccines( booster) . They offer some protection. It keeps evolving. New sub variants will arise. as the virus mutates. Personally, I would recommend it, problem is so many will not take any vaccines. We have highest rate of SARS-Cov-19 than any other country

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I think with a shot plus covid positive after, the next infection is very mild and immunity lasts longer.At least it was in my case. Got the j&j late 2021 no booster. 1st positive in Jan then positive again in May. 1st one I was really ill but no respiratory issues or congestion at all. 2nd it was like a cold that lasted a few days and wasn't even symptomatic after 3 days.

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So far the vaccines have stayed the same while the virus has changed considerably - when new vaccines come out you will need to take those.

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