Press J to jump to the feed. Press question mark to learn the rest of the keyboard shortcuts
Found the internet!

Computer Science: Theory and Application

r/compsci

82
pinned by moderators
Posted by2 years ago
HelpfulSilver3Hugz2
82
88 comments
485
Posted by
3 years ago
Helpful2WholesomeHugz
485
44 comments
109
Posted by17 hours ago
109
6 comments
0
Posted by5 hours ago

Hey y'all, I want to talk about programming from the human perspective, how we think about code, and the benefits of introducing a paradigm that changes that.

My work sent me to a Microsoft conference recently where one particular session caught my interest. It was about "low code", like what is being used in some products like Microsoft Power Products. The main selling point for "low code" is obviously that it is easier to learn and use without a coding background. To us computer nerds, that sounds lame because it is just dumbing down the super powerful and awesome stuff we can already do perfectly well. This particular session was a panel discussion, and honestly, most of the panelists described it exactly that way. Most of them were concerned with how it can be used to help non-tech people make business solutions...

But there was one panelist who was talking as if he were my own internal monologue. He said that low code is going in the same direction that computation always has been. Low code makes you sacrifice a little bit of control and focus on higher-level things, kind of like how we don't care about memory locations and CPU registers when we write in Python or Java.

I caught him after the session to give him a cryptic warning about the future of low code. His vision aligns perfectly with mine, but not necessarily all of the current trends. A lot of low code is not really abstracting away complexity of modern languages, but is just taking the features of existing programming languages and removing a large portion of them, essentially just dumbing them down. No objects, no scoped variables, no functions, no parameters, no recursions, etc. Low code solutions remove some of the complexity of things like connecting to other sources or interfacing with other things, but the logic itself is just programming but stupider.

But what I think low code should be is a paradigm shift. If you compare Java to an Assembly language, sure, you're not worried about CPU registers anymore, but you're worried about higher constructs that are more powerful. Objects, functions, packages, libraries, etc. Low code should similarly enable you to work with higher level constructs and change how you, the human, solve the problems.

Anyway, I would love to start making my own language parser to explore some of these ideas. You probably don't know exactly how to make a new beautiful programming language with a fundamentally different paradigm, but in your experience, what are the variables? What things could you tinker with and turn upside down to maybe change programming forever? One great example in my mind is actually Excel. It does computation, but in a very different way than any actual programming language. It narrows the scope a lot, but it became a powerful and famous tool for things that would have previously required complex coding and a different, probably more complicated, problem-solving approach.

0
5 comments
73
Posted by1 day ago
73
12 comments

About Community

Computer Science Theory and Application. We share and discuss any content that computer scientists find interesting. People from all walks of life welcome, including hackers, hobbyists, professionals, and academics.
Created Mar 24, 2008

2.1m

Members

109

Online

Top 1%

Ranked by Size

r/compsci Rules

1.
Question with limited appeal
2.
Career question
3.
Not CS
4.
Introductory material or homework

Moderators

Moderator list hidden. Learn More