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r/Monkeypox
485
Posted by2 months ago

Moderna considering creating an mRNA monkeypox vaccine amid growing demand for shots

115 comments
97% Upvoted
level 1

2024: ok the Moderna Monkeypox shots are ready!

Meanwhile, Japan has LC16m8 in hand right now, a 3rd gen smallpox vaccine safe to give to children and even babies.

197
level 2

Do you know if foreigners can purchase it?

2
level 2

No, moderna can create vaccines in 7 days. They’ve done it before and we were testing in 3 months. What’s the hold up here?

2
level 2
Comment removed by moderator · 2 mo. ago
level 1

Consider it faster.

81
level 2

It needs to be done yesterday. I dont see things going great once school starts back and people start gathering indoors due to colder weather in the next couple of months

52
level 2
Comment deleted by user · 2 mo. ago
level 1

Dolly, save us again!

10
level 1

Yes please, let's broaden the market, ramp up production and make it cost effective for developing nations.

78
level 2
Comment deleted by user · 2 mo. ago
level 1

Do it

15
level 1

More vaccines is a good thing. I had no problem with mRna vaccine for covid, so I'm OK with it.

57
level 2

A vaccine developed specifically for monkeypox might be a good thing as well.

54
level 2

Me too.

6
level 1

I would rather see more contracts to manufacture the existing vaccines that are known to work well against Monkeypox, this isnt Covid where we had to invent something new from scratch

3
level 1
· 2 mo. ago · edited 2 mo. ago

Would an mRNA vaccine work on a DNA virus?

I’m not a scientist, but it’s my understanding that mRNA worked on Covid because Covid is a virus of the RNA?

Monkeypox is listed as an “enveloped double-stranded DNA virus”. Wouldn’t we need a DNA vaccine for a DNA virus?

https://www.who.int/teams/health-product-policy-and-standards/standards-and-specifications/vaccines-quality/dna

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1986720/

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/DNA_vaccine

I’m 100% on board with creating new vaccines as we desperately need them, but if we already have the technology to create a DNA vaccine, wouldn’t it be more effective to go that route?

(Just want to reiterate that I’m asking because I don’t know but would like to understand. Hopefully someone here with a scientific background in vaccine development can share some insight on this topic)

24
level 2

Why would it matter? The mRNA is to make your cells produce the proteins, it doesn’t have anything to do with the fact that COVID is an RNA virus

89
level 2
· 2 mo. ago · edited 2 mo. ago

No, because the mRNA vaccine uses your cell's protein making machinery to produce proteins that look like a chunk of the virus, which your immune system then produces antibodies for. Whether it's an RNA or DNA virus is irrelevant.

9
level 2

The mRNA is delivering an instruction to the cells of the vaccine recipient to manufacture a protein structure present on the virus so that the body can learn to mount an immune response against it.

Whether the generic information of the virus is encoded by DNA or RNA should not make any difference to this mechanism of action.

5

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